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Glaucoma In Horses
WRITTEN BY: Cheryl Sutor   [1997]


The eye has two chambers which are divided by the lens:

1. The posterior chamber - This is the back half of the eye. It is filled with a gel-like fluid which helps maintain the shape of the eye.

2. The anterior chamber - This is the front half of the eye. It is filled with a water-like fluid.


The fluid drains away slowly, causing pressure in the eye.

A certain amount of pressure in the horse's eye is healthy, this pressure helps maintain the shape of the eye. If the fluid-producing cells generate fluid too fast or if the canals become clogged, the pressure from excess fluid builds. The canals becoming clogged is the cause for glaucoma. Laser surgery is available to reduce the amount of fluid being produced. To find out more about laser surgery, contact your vet and ask him for the phone number of a good Equine Opthamologist.


Glaucoma in horses is rare

If at all, glaucoma will start early in a horse's life. However, an older horse may acquire glaucoma from anything that might cause eye inflammation. Usually, the blockage of the canals is caused by some congenital anomolies.





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This article was published on: 1997. Last updated on: 1997.